A legend tells the story of the Creation of the Earth

England, Scotland, South Korea, Spain, Walking, Weather

Every culture throughout the world has its myths about how the earth, and everything that inhabits the earth, came into being. Here in the UK, historically part of the Judeo-Christian tradition, we’re most familiar with the creation story told in The Book of Genesis.

Day 1 – God created light and separated the light from the darkness, calling light ‘day’ and darkness ‘night’. And God said, Let there be light: and there was light.

Day 2 – God created an expanse of sky to separate the waters. Let there be a firmament in the midst of the waters.

Kirkudbrightshire

Day 3 – God created the dry ground and gathered the waters, calling the dry ground ‘land’, and the gathered waters ‘seas’. Let the waters under the heaven be gathered together unto one place, and let the dry land appear: and it was so.

On day three, God also created plant life. Let the earth bring forth grass, the herb yielding seed, and the fruit tree yielding fruit after his kind, whose seed is in itself, upon the earth: and it was so.

Day 4 – God created the sun, moon, and the stars to give light to the earth and to govern and separate the day and the night. These would also serve as signs to mark seasons, days, and years.  Let there be lights in the firmament of the heaven to divide the day from the night; and let them be for signs, and for seasons, and for days, and years.

Near Grinton, North Yorkshire
Sleningford, North Yorkshire

Day 5 – God created every living creature of the seas and every winged bird, blessing them to multiply and fill the waters and the sky with life. Let the waters bring forth abundantly the moving creature that hath life, and fowl that may fly above the earth in the open firmament of heaven…  Let the earth bring forth the living creature after his kind, cattle, and creeping thing, and beast of the earth after his kind: and it was so.

Day 6 – God created man and woman in his own image. He gave them every creature and the whole earth to rule over, care for, and cultivate. Let us make man in our image, after our likeness: and let them have dominion over the fish of the sea, and over the fowl of the air, and over the cattle, and over all the earth, and over every creeping thing that creepeth upon the earth. Which is perhaps where it all started to go wrong …

Along the River Thames in London
Haeundae, Busan, South Korea.

This week, for Lens-Artist Challenge #192, Amy invites us to tell Earth’s Story. So I have, with the help of the Old Testament.

PS. Thanks to your ‘likes’ on this recent post, I’ve been able to donate £28.00 on your behalf to World Central Kitchens, as they feed the dispossessed fleeing from war in Ukraine and other humanitarian catastrophes.

Noticing the notices: a Saturday smile.

England, India, Scotland, Spain

Trawling through my photos looking for something I couldn’t find, I came across these.

The featured photo comes from RSPB Saltholme.

Cee’s Friday Funny Finds

Six Word Saturday

New Kinds of Standing Stones

Blogging challenges, Scotland

Dumfries and Galloway is good at pre- and early history. I took you to Cairn Holy a few days ago. And apparently their long tradition of standing stones lives on. I had a walk along the beach at Mossyard Bay, and this is what I found – standing stones, no higher than a school ruler, erected – oh, as late as September 2020.

This one is for this week’s photo challenge: something less ordinary beside the sea. The same shot, just above it, has been squared off for Kinda Square.

2020 Photo Challenge #40

#Kinda Square

Two of a Kind: Cairn Holy

Blogging challenges, Scotland

Two tombs, jagged and skeletal, lie at the top of a narrow country road in Dumfries and Galloway.  Cairn Holy 1 and Cairn Holy 2. They’re two of a kind: the final resting places of notable people living some 5000 years ago.  Might one of them have been the tomb of the legendary King Galdus?  Probably not, but we shall never know.

What’s astonishing though is the wealth that these tombs once contained.  Particularly amazing is a jadeite axe.  This mineral is not found locally, but comes from the Alps, 1500 km away.  Imagine having the wealth and power in Neolithic times to import such an exotic artefact!

These tombs didn’t originally have the standing-stone appearance they now have.  The stones originally totally covering them have been plundered for building over the centuries.  But standing stark against the landscape they announce themselves as being yet another sign of the ancient history which is still so visible in this part of Scotland.

KindaSquare

Trusty’s Hill and Rutherford’s Monument

Blogging challenges, Scotland, Walking

This composite image of my walk was automatically generated by Google. I think it’s grasped the sweep of this landscape quite well.

A sortie to find some carved Pictish stones on what might once have been a royal fort, followed by a climb to visit a local landmark, the obelisk to the Reverend Samuel Rutherford seemed like a plan for a late afternoon last week.  It was only a three and a half mile walk after all.

What I hadn’t taken into account was that this is rough, undulating landscape, and entirely beautiful.  It demands we take the time to stand and stare.  So I did.

Trusty’s Hill proved to be a chance for a first viewing of the Rutherford Monument, as well as an opportunity to peer at Pictish carvings.  This site was the site of an ancient fire so fierce that the stone there vitrified.  The hill might, round about 600 AD, have been a citadel. It was certainly a fine vantage point from which to view  what could once have been the lost Scottish kingdom of Rheged.

The view from Trusty’s Hill

Onwards to the Rutherford Monument, built by grateful parishioners to honour the memory of a priest who, though an academic, a thinker and a teacher, cared for his flock in practical as well as spiritual ways and who was constantly at odds with the establishment to the extent that he was awaiting being tried for treason at his death.  These days, there’s a Millennium Cairn, detailing all the ministers of Anwoth and Girthon since 1560 , and a trig point on two adjacent hills.  All three provide splendid views to the Fleet estuary far below and the hills beyond.

Then it was down, down through a wooded trail to reach Anwoth Church, now roofless and ruined, before coming back to Gatehouse of Fleet along a quiet county track.

 

Jo’s Monday Walk

2020 Photo Challenge #39

‘Beside the Seaside, Beside the Sea …’

Blogging challenges, Scotland

Dumfries & Galloway is our new favourite place.  We felt as though we’d discovered it and had it all to ourselves.  We explored the wildly beautiful and seemingly remote Cairnsmore of Fleet National Natural Nature Reserve. We found ancient cairns.  We slogged up hills for the sake of views over the Solway Firth. And we enjoyed the beaches.  We’ll take a virtual seaside trip today: there’s not a fairground ride, amusement arcade or kiss-me-quick hat in sight.  There’s not even a chippie.  Just us, the rocky shore, and the sea, advancing or retreating with the tide.

Let’s begin at Mossyard Bay.  I sent you a postcard from there just last Thursday.

 

Near Mutehill, Kirkudbright, early one morning.

Finally, Carsethorne, near Dumfries. It’s a small hamlet now, but it used to be a busy port, shipping people to Liverpool, to the Isle of Man and to Ireland on their way to a new life in the New World.

Six Word Saturday.