Bookstack Challenge

Books and reading

This is an idea from Rebecca, of BookishBeck fame, who’s built a #Solidarity Stack of books, which you can read about here. Like her, I’ve used books from my shelves to tell something of the story of the disaster unfolding in Ukraine through their titles: in this case, the contents are irrelevant.

We can do so little. Many of us have already donated to Aid Agencies. But another Rebecca, blogging as Fake Flamenco drew another charity to my attention: World Central Kitchen: Chefs for Ukraine are providing hot nourishing meals to those in flight: and other chefs, in other places torn apart by war or natural disaster, undertake similar work. Sadly, Ukraine is not alone in continuing to face catastrophe. For every ‘like’ this post receives I’ll donate 0.50 to this charity. I’m hoping for lots and lots of ‘likes’!

It’s beyond imagining. But in the short term, every refugee is taking the journey shown in my next pile, and hoping to find safety and a place of Sanctuary: the bottom book in my pile.

Maybe you could join in this challenge with your own book stack, and attract ‘likes’ in your turn? Let’s do it!

44 thoughts on “Bookstack Challenge

    1. It does seem small, but I sometimes get rather a lot of ‘likes’, and hope to get more for this. I need to make sure I can carry out my pledge, following our original donation. It would be good if others joined in: snowball effect!

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  1. Is it tasteless? I don’t know. Everything we do at the moment seems frivolous. Even moaning about the cost of living. I’m impressed with the stacks, and the contents of your bookshelves. I’ll have to browse mine to see what I have got.

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  2. Your second selection feels just a little more hopeful, but what an indictment on our country that we haven’t provided sanctuary as quickly as Ireland has managed.

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  3. It’s so tragic, and so cruel and so unnecessary and so evil. It’s also heartbreaking. If I lived in Poland or another country near I’d have my home filled with refugees, as I know many are doing. We are so very lucky to live here.

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    1. Yes. And may the refugees meet help, support and kindness on the way. It looks as though many do. Until, perhaps, for some of them, the UK is their destination. Positive things could await them here – if they could get past The System.

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  4. I also found World Central Kitchen and was surprised that I’d not heard of them before. They are working in so many areas of the world.

    José Andrés, the founder states simply – “World Central Kitchen started with a simple idea at home with my wife Patricia: when people are hungry, send in cooks. Not tomorrow, today.” …….and that’s what they do!

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  5. Of course you have a like from me – I think that’s a very thoughtful idea. I’ve just been talking on Facebook messenger with my friend in Severodonetsk, which was bombed yesterday. He had wanted to stay (they already fled once, from Luhansk eight years ago) but now feels they must get out. Luckily he is over 60 so will be allowed to leave, and they have friends in Germany to go to, if they are able to make the journey. I hope he goes, we are all worried about him while he stays there.

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    1. Oh, all positive thoughts for him and his family. And te thousands and thousands of others. Having that personal connection must make this dreadful tragedy so very much more real and immediate to you, Sarah.

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  6. Your book titles concisely track the tragedy in Ukraine (which has frightening global ramifications as we are all aware). Thanks for alerting us to World Central Kitchen. Thanks for making your donation.

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    1. Well, let’s see how many ‘likes’ I get. If it’s not that many, I may well up it to £1. Yes, I like the look of WKC- maybe it’s one I’ll support regularly as, sadly, the need for these charities is not going to disappear.

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  7. I’ve already found World Central Kitchen and donated to their efforts on the Polish border. I have huge admiration for the proactive people who are busy loading vans to transport foods and warm clothing overland. International aid have huge resources, and then you look at people whose earnings could feed a continent. And meanwhile, the bombardment continues.

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    1. Exactly. We’ve been advised not to send goods though, as they’re overwhelmed and can’t cope with them. It occurs to me that money sent to provide food, blankets etc. would probably be spent in the host country, which can only be good, given how much they – unlike our own government – have done to welcome people. It’ so hard to know what to do for best, isn’t it?

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  8. As a P.S.- I’m not sure if this is a good idea, but Wilbur Travels is encouraging people to book AirBnb accommodation in the Ukraine’s stricken cities, with no intention to stay there, but as a direct means of getting an income to the people of Kviv, etc

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    1. I’ve heard a lot of people are doing this. I’d want to know that the ‘landlords’ involved are sure to get their money, but on the face of it, a good idea.

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  9. I like your book stack and it’s nice to show support in any way we can. We had a team meeting at work the other day, with both Ukrainian and Russian colleagues participating. What is going on is devastating for both sides and I wish I could help with more than kind words. Thanks for making us aware of the World Central Kitchen which sounds like a good idea. I’ve so far been donating through DEC, because the UK government matched all contributions pound for pound (don’t know if it still applies). Of course you got a like from me. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Yes, we donated through a refugee charity that had attracted a £ for £ donor, and which is working with other refugees too. Ukraine IS awful, but there are so many others in desperate situations too. It’s hard to know what to do for the best.

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  10. You’ve gotten 47 likes already, my friend. What a wonderful way to give. I like your stacks of books. that took a lot of time to figure out which books would tell the story. I think people could do something similar with whatever post they write and donate an amount per like.

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    1. Thanks so much for that Marsha – that’s brilliant -although I couldn’t open the link back when I tried .. Funny old WordPress!

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  11. I think this is a great idea and there are only small ways we can help but it increases focus and attention which should also end in practical actions for those who can really help. I shall try your challenge.

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    1. Oh do! I’ll be interested in the result. And thanks so much for commenting. It reminds me I haven’t totted up the ‘likes’ and sent the donation. I was leaving it ten days or so…. but ten days has grown rather longer … Not that the situation has gone away, by a very long chalk.

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      1. Ah, War and Peace. I’m reading it as part of the year-long readathon, though I’m well ahead now as a chapter-a-day doesn’t suit me. I have to admit, it’s still a ‘duty read’. More than 600 pages in, in hasn’t got under my skin, so I clearly am missing something.

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      2. I agree and find the first parts slow although the war descriptions and situations drew me in. I didn’t remember much from my first reading years ago.Now I am almost halfway I am in parts of the book that drew me in such us Pierre, his ideals and freemasonry and the love between Natasha and Balkonsky. Am much more aware now of place and the politics of the rulers, the serfs, the Napoleonic code of law. Tolstoy has insight into this as well as his characters.

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