Another day, another view

I’m not so blinkered as to believe that Yorkshire has all the best bits of scenery.  I’ve had days to recharge the soul in every English county from south to north, from west to east, enjoying stirring uplands, gentle verdant hillsides, sky-filled flatlands, slowly-flowing rivers and tranquilly tinkling streams, and the constantly-changing views from the beach at the seaside.

All the same, what we saw whilst out walking today gave every picture postcard of anywhere outside the Yorkshire Dales a run for its money.

John's view of Yorkshire, as described on his T shirt, is the correct one.
John’s view of Yorkshire, as described on his T-shirt, is the correct one.

From Pateley Bridge, set in the heart of Nidderdale (Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty), we energetically panted and clambered through Guisecliff Wood, whilst looking down at the village of Glasshouses below.  We emerged, puffing for breath at the top, One way, we could look across the Daleside landscape of ancient field systems and stone-built settlements, to the vale of York beyond.

Looking across towards the Dales.
Looking across towards the Dales.

The other way were the moors, no longer bleak, because this is heather time.  We breathed in the intoxicating smell that I like to buy potted up as rich, almost peaty flavoured heather honey. We stared, almost mesmerised at those carpets of blooms stretching away from us, mile after mile: not lilac, not lavender, not violet nor damson – simply that special low-key subtle purple that only heather can deliver.

Marching through the heather.
Marching through the heather.

Past Yorke’s Folly: it’s said it was built in 1810, commissioned by the local landowner, John Yorke of Bewerley Hall, who was casting about for some means to keep his labourers in employment in a time of economic depression.  These men received a shilling and a loaf of bread a day for their efforts.

Yorke's Folly: a resting place for weary walkers to enjoy the view.
Yorke’s Folly: a resting place for weary walkers to enjoy the view.

Then it was back to woodland again – very English woodland, with a full green canopy, not yet ready to turn to autumnal colours.  Skrikes Wood, Nought Bank, Fishpond Wood.

Skrikes Wood.
Skrikes Wood.

Then back along a few final paths before returning to Pateley, and a very welcome pub lunch.

The final furlong.
The final furlong.

21 thoughts on “Another day, another view”

  1. beautiful as always. As a Yorkshire woman I agree with John’s Tshirt, almost. East Sussex is 2/3 AONB the Downs part of which is now National Park. We have woodland, rolling hills and valleys and spectacular coast. I’ve always thought that walking on the Downs is like the Yorkshire Dales with the sea at the edge. We’re just about to go to A-V for 3 weeks to experience even grander scenery and begin to get work out of Jeremy’s system. last day there tomorrow!

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    1. Thank you. Yes, I love East Sussex too. I used to live in Pompey and work in Lewes, so got to know stretches of the countryside to some extent – as seen from the railway line anyway. Have a wonderful time in AV and give the Ariege our love. Tell Jeremy to take early retirement!

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    1. Where do you go in the States for heather? Somewhere, surely? And I plan to do a post soon on local place names. They speak of Vikings, Saxons, as well as Romans taking their place in our local landscapes.

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      1. I don’t think there’s anywhere here that has heather like you do but I may be wrong. There’s so much of my own country I haven’t seen! I’ll look forward to reading about the place names!

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  2. Your photos are lovely and transport me to this peaceful part of your world. Actually looks at times as though you’re walking across the top of Englad. Nice story about the folly and the generousity it represented.

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  3. Lovely. It’s a beautiful part of the world (and I speak as the daughter of a Yorkshirewoman). I used to live in North Yorks – I arrived in the winter and thought it was terribly bleak but a few years later had fallen in love with the moors. Plus I lived near a hill called Roseberry Topping – how can you not like a hill that sounds like a pudding?

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    1. I love the moors, though they have more appeal when the sun shines. But the Dales, a little softer in appearance, are our own stamping ground. Trust you to find a foodie association with Roseberry Topping!

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  4. Thank you for the reminder of your stunning county Margaret. Andrew bought me a new pair of walking boots yesterday and my first statement was that we’d have to go back to the Dales!

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  5. Lovely views – it’s rainy and dreary here and if i walk today, it won’t be as beautiful as your walk through Yorkshire. I am envious, but I’ll have to enjoy your walks vicariously. I have a different walk for the coming week, but a three day holiday on the horizon. Have a great week. Thank you for sharing and for the INSPIRATION.

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