A History of a Holiday in Fifteen Trees – Eight

Blogging challenges, Catalonia, Spain

Our first foray from Premià  was to Argentona. Nope, we’d never heard of it either. But we found out that Gaudi’s contemporary Josep Puig i Cadafalch had built a house here, and that seemed reason enough to visit. Reader, it was closed for renovations, and this is about all we could see:

Were we dismayed? only a bit. An International Ceramics Fair was in town, and we had fun tagging along, watching the potter in the featured photo, visiting the museum, taking in the sights in this ancient town, and finally, having lunch at an Uruguayan restaurant. Here’s a small gallery, which even features an ancient gnarled tree that really didn’t appreciate attempts to square it off.

TreeSquare

35 thoughts on “A History of a Holiday in Fifteen Trees – Eight

  1. Love the gallery, Margaret. It looks such a nice place and I love ceramics. A few wearing masks, most not? It’s an enormous restriction in the heat but most here still wear them in town.

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  2. It was unusual. Spain had that very week removed the directive to wear masks at all times outside the home, but most people continued to do so, despite the heat. But you’re right – there are few mask-wearers in these shots, which I took early in the day. It changed as the day wore on and the number of people increased.

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  3. Argentona looks interestingly quirky, a lovely place to look around, plenty to interest. The Gaudi contemporary’s place looked a tad Gormenghast in your image…

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    1. That’s probably a little unfair. As far as I could tell, it was more fairy-tale castle vying with monastic simplicity. The fifth photo is also from there. But yes, I’d cheerfully visit again.

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  4. There’s something therapeutic about watching a skilled potter at their wheel isn’t there? And, it’s such an ancient tradition too. Shame about the ‘closed for repair’ – the glimpses are tantalising.

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    1. I know. But it’s an excuse to go back. And as beguiling as the potter were the children, taking it in turns to confect lopsided and unsteady coil pots for their parents to hang onto for the rest of the day.

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  5. Argentona / Argentina. Any connection I wonder? Silver must feature somewhere on would think. You have found some interesting places on your trip. I’m a little worried by that enormous looking locust though!

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    1. I doubt if there’s a connection, and the silver sounds a nice idea, but again, no, I don’t think so. Yes, I thought this new church gargoyle was – er – interesting. There were hens and frogs and all sorts!

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  6. ooh looks my kind of place, and how fabulous there was a ceramics fair when you were there. How on earth did they manage the international though with all the restrictions?!

    and hee hee I got to the end and thought she hasn’t squared but then I remembered the fabulous ones at the start. Great post as always Margaret

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  7. Oh I love all those – the trees and everything else with the play of light you’ve brought out everywhere. I also like the Picasso-like amphora in bright colours. And I love the pic of the sail-shaped awnings in front of the church – beautiful! Is that gargoyle in the shape of a cricket? About to carry off a human, perhaps clergy, from the church and fly over land and sea?

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    1. Remind me to show you the Picasso ceramics they have in the museum there. As to the church – I’ll show you some more gargoyles too. When they had the church restored, they clearly encouraged the masons involved to have a bit of fun.

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