Of Black, White, Colour and Flight

Blogging challenges, England, Wildlife

Two busy housing estates for birds.

Terns on the Farne Islands: visitors unwelcome!

Slimbridge Wetland Centre: hungry godwits feeding.

Flamingoes in black, white – and pink.

Click on any image to see it full-size

Six Word Saturday

CBWC: Anything in Flight

Bird Weekly Photo Challenge

57 thoughts on “Of Black, White, Colour and Flight

  1. Hello Magret, this is a very nice contribution, whereby I am particularly interested in the terns. The lowest swallow is clearly a Sterna hirundo red beak red legs. I am not sure about the first one because I cannot assess the size well, it could be the rare species Sternula albifrons or the Sterna sandvicensis. both very rare species in Germany

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      1. I’ll take a look at the website. I can’t tell from the photos if the birds have red bills. This can be clearly seen in the photo below. But it could also be young birds that still have a black beak in the first year. In any case, you took beautiful photos that I was very interested in

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  2. Magaret, a wonderful selection of birds and the black/white & colour slider on the flamigo is clever. Is that a WordPress feature? Oh, those terns are seriously NOT impressed with the swarm of camera yielding visitors. Scary!

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  3. Your first series of photos do look quite scary. I wouldn’t want to be there, unless, of course, I was far enough away with a 500mm lens πŸ˜€ Great selection of photos for all these challenges.

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  4. The one with the bird in the left corner really struck me as interesting. Part the bird, part the composition or crop, part the atmosphere.

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  5. Wonderful gallery of birds this week, Margaret. I’m so glad you got your stuff back and going again. Love those terns and flamingos. I’m hoping we see the single flamingo in a couple of weeks when we go to St. Marks Wildlife Refuge. I really want to get a good photo of it. πŸ™‚

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      1. He or she blew in with Hurricane Michael when it hit the panhandle of Florida a few years ago at Cat 5 storm. He or she never left. If the bird wanted company, I think the bird would have flown south by now. It could have been a juvenile separated with a flock at the time and doesn’t know any better. It feeds either alone or with other large birds like the Great Blue Heron. πŸ™‚

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  6. Those tern photos are very dramatic. I wonder why the birds were so disturbed – do you think it might have been because there were so many visitors, the visitors were very close, or the birds were breeding perhaps??

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