One Misty Moisty Morning …

North Yorkshire, Walking, Weather

… yesterday in fact, I woke up to this.

It’s the same window I showed you last Monday, but now November mist has descended. I went downstairs. This.

It wasn’t raining. It wasn’t particularly cold. What’s one of the Commandments of Lockdown? ‘Thou shalt exercise daily’. So I did. I took my camera, and explored the local lanes: familiar sights blotted out, as others loomed out from the general obscurity. At just 11 o’clock, I stopped, just for a while: it was Remembrance Day. I heard what a rarely notice as I walk – the constant undertow of birds murmuring and chittering on more distant shrubs and trees. It reminded me of John Lewis-Stempel’s book – Where Poppies Blow. This wonderful account examines the restorative role of nature to those soldiers confined to the trenches in the First World War. For just a fleeting instant, this was a moment I could share with them. Except I came home to a glowing wood-burning stove and a hot cup of coffee.

59 thoughts on “One Misty Moisty Morning …

  1. I remember those misty mornings! Beautiful photos though I’d need to be rugged up indoors. Actually we have a most unseasonable blast of winter today for some reason – storms, wild winds and it’s cold by our standards, mid teens max in November is not normal!

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  2. Interesting, I had a similar thought yesterday afternoon while walking in our local forest preserve. The preserve is in the process of burning parts of the grasslands and forest floors to combat invasive species and I thought of the soldiers of World War I fighting in the forests and trenches of the Western Front and the book Where Poppies Blow.

    We’ve had unseasonably warm weather the past week but we are returning to the normal weather pattern soon -cold and dreary returns. Fortunately, we can come inside and warm up a luxury not afforded the soldiers over a century ago. Stay well, safe, and move purposefully. Peace.

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    1. Thanks Clay. We don’t have a lot to complain about when we look at those lives (and deaths) in the trenches, do we? Stay well, and positive!

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  3. I love some of those misty views, got some myself at Fountains the other day. For some reason I can’t comment on your posts now, no idea what I’m doing wrong!

    Just wanted to say that I liked your last book suggestions and I’m reading β€˜Mend the Living’, at the moment. Finding it quite enthralling, and interesting so far, and liking the writing style.

    Hope you’re both keeping well. X

    On Mon, 9 Nov 2020 at 07:53, From Pyrenees to Pennines wrote:

    > margaret21 posted: ” … yesterday in fact, I woke up to this. It’s the > same window I showed you last Monday, but now November mist has descended. > I went downstairs. This. It wasn’t raining. It wasn’t particularly cold. > What’s one of the Commandments of L” >

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    1. Hi Joyce. Are you trying to comment when you’re actually reading the post on the blog itself, or are you commenting direct from the email? That can cause problems! So glad you’re enjoying Mend the Living. I think it’s special. I’ve just come back from a very misty Fountains Too!

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  4. Oh yes, gorgeous, lovely photographs. I don’t know about you, but I never appreciated the autumn as much as I do now the moment I go out to take some pictures. The mists and the lowlight, who needs endless blue skies?

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  5. What a beautiful post Margaret, I really loved it. Your images are of course wonderful but the sentiment you expressed about sharing a moment with the soldiers in the trenches really rang true for me, and I loved that went on to say you got to come home afterwards. Really well written and wonderfully thoughtful.

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