Top Scran (2) … or Top Scran Too

A few days ago, I showed you our top food tip for this time of year – wild garlic.  The local sheep disagree.  For them, nothing beats a mangelwurzel, and this sheep here is jealously guarding her pile of them.  This time, I have no recipes to share, top or otherwise.  Sorry.

#Squaretops 19

41 thoughts on “Top Scran (2) … or Top Scran Too”

  1. Now THIS is interesting. We know MANGOLD, but only as a slightly bitter veggie. We use it for gratins or braised and eaten ‘al dente,’ with some Fleur de Sel or, preferably, Maldon Sea Salt Flakes (THE best sea salt EVAAA). I didn’t even know that Mangold have these large root balls. So interesting! Thanks…
    And the word is German as Wurzel means root. Sheep are not as stupid as we think, obviously….. 🐏🐑💚

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      1. It IS a chewy word – and that’s what I like in languages in general…. I was waxing lyrically over the word SQUEAKY CLEAN this very morning. Had to explain to HH its meaning 🙂

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    1. I had a little trawl, and it looks as though humans will eat the leaves if pushed, but never the roots. But they ARE supposed to be nutritious. Not tempted then? Me neither.

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  2. Such a fabulous word, and we hardly ever get the chance to use it. Mangelwurzel. Just saying it out loud is magnificent 😁 They don’t look appetising I have to say, but then neither does Celeriac with all its mangled roots and earth trapped between them. But cleaned up and thinly sliced they make the most wonderful dauphinoise dish. Or celeriac chips. Or even raw as thin matchsticks.

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  3. In my experience most things are edible with the addition of a lot of butter, black pepper and garlic but I think that even I would draw the line at those!

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  4. Well that is interesting, and to see it is a type of beet. The name Mangelwurzel rings faint bells from my childhood. Did we know someone with a dog named Mangelwurzel or was it nickname my Dad conferred on a colleague? I simply can’t remember … I wonder if the word has a slightly comical ring to German speakers too, or only to us mired in English?

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