A Toadflax Top-knot

Look at the charming old bridge at West Tanfield.  Keep looking.  You’ll spot it eventually.  A close-up shot is not an option.

It’s been around since 1734.  JMW Turner sketched it in 1816.  Tour de France riders hurtled over it in 2014.  It’s a fine place to stand and look at a Proper English Village View.

But today, I had a surprise.  I saw a small clump of toadflax had chosen to grow on the very top, just where I was leaning over.  A fine addition, I thought.

#Squaretops 28

37 thoughts on “A Toadflax Top-knot”

      1. I probably didn’t explain that comment well enough, Margaret. As it looks so proper, I think I would not fit in, as there would be pressure to uphold certain standards of behaviour – English etiquette and such like. Having said that, I would love to visit, but just could not live in such a place full time. I would be frightened of “breaking the china.” Do you get what I mean?

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      2. It’s a properly mixed community with all kinds and conditions of inhabitants. You’d be welcomed. Its chocolate-box looks from the vantage point of the bridge don’t tell the whole story.

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      1. Thanks – it’s my own fault – listening to David Copperfield and although I know Dora dies it is sadder than I remember. I must say it is being read extremely well by Richard Armitage.

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      2. Noooooo – I had to stop. I got towards the end, they have Cromwell in the tower and it’s like reading about your pet puppy being tortured. Told my sister I will resume and finish when times are generally less ghastly.

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  1. Lovely to see toadflax in those beautiful northern hills. You have certainly had the good weather while we were rained on! Loved the photos on Gouthwaite reservoir. You make me long for those very dramatic places and we would have been back with family and some Pennine walks on the Manc side. Still no complaints yet and hope all goes well for you.

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    1. Oh, I like your tale better than my tale, which was that it was deliberately imported by a London chap who like his garden, in about 1640. We’ll go with yours.

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