Snapshot Saturday: Bridges towards the sights of Seville

We were in Seville two years ago.  Just like every other tourist, we wanted history, the sights, tapas.

 

 

On our walk from the station to our hotel, down narrow back streets, we discovered Seville has other less publicised art works.  Almost every garage door that we passed had been decorated: graffiti style, country scenes, market scenes and cars, especially cars…..

 

 

Artist at work …

A few however, bridged the gap between the narrow back streets of our first walk just beyond the city centre, and the discoveries we’d make in the next few days, by depicting views of a city we came to love in our short visit.

View of the Cathedral, la Giralda, and the bridge.
Puente de Isabel II
A more romantic view of Seville by night, looking across the river Guadalquivir towards the Puente de San Telmo and the Torre del Oro.

In response to this week’s WordPress challenge: ‘Bridge’ 

 

15 thoughts on “Snapshot Saturday: Bridges towards the sights of Seville”

    1. Really? I know what you mean though. So very many ways of bridging the gap, from rickety wooden structures, to country humps in solid chunks of stone, and ever more technical after that.,

      Liked by 1 person

      1. oh your stunningly beautiful daughter in that photo? I volunteer in a chemo unit and told another beautiful 32 yo about your daughters courageous photo … she got it! And was even brave enough to take her turban off to show her father and I the bit of bum fluff growing back altho she is in the middle of her second lot of chemo. We both gave her the courage to investigate surgery which was an option she wasn’t open to before .. so please thank your daughter for helping those that she may never meet 🙂

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  1. What is the painting with the men wearing white pointed hoods?? They look like our American hate group, the Ku Klux Klan! That’s creepy. The rest of the city looks very lovely, though!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Those robes have been around a lot longer than the Klu Klux Klan. They were worn by penitents during Holy Week from the middle ages onwards. Though penitent, the hoods enabled those sinners to conceal their identities. Does that sort that one out 😉 ?

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      1. It’s like the swastika symbol having a long history before it was co-opted by the Nazis, I guess. And the KKK used the hoods to hide the identities of sinners, too . . .

        Liked by 1 person

  2. I love the second to last bridge shot – the Puente de Isabel II – the silhouettes of the people on the bridge are wonderful, especially the bike rider. I love the dark lines of the bridge and the soft greys of the river and sky.

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