Snapshot Saturday: A Korean cultural heritage – against the odds

palace11592 was a terrible year for Korea.  The Japanese invaded.  They raged through the land destroying all they saw.  They burnt ancient temples and state-of-the-art palaces as well as ordinary homes.  Little was left.

Imagine an England in which every cultural icon was destroyed in WWII – Buckingham Palace, St. Paul’s Cathedral, York Minster, Salisbury Cathedral, Chatsworth….. that’s the kind of morale-destroying disaster Korea faced in 1592.

Rather than accept these losses, Koreans rolled up their sleeves and built everything again, on the same site, and to the same design.  Not just once, but in some cases several times, as a consequence of later invasions and revolts.  Unlike our own historic buildings, these structures are made not from stone or brick, but from the wood from monumental long-lived trees with statuesque trunks and mighty branches.  These palaces and places of worship are carved to traditional patterns and painted in an accepted range of colours with time-honoured designs and images.  To our eyes, these palaces and temples look fairly similar.  But once we overheard a group talking – ‘Look, anyone can see that’s twelfth century: not a bit like the 15th century style we were looking at earlier’.

Here’s Seoul’s Changdeokgung Palace.  It was first built in 1408 for the Joseon royal dynasty and designed with an extensive natural garden in harmony with the topography of its surroundings.  The Japanese burnt it down in 1592.  It was rebuilt in 1608, burnt down during a political revolt in 1628, and again by the Chinese Manchu-Qing.  Each time it was faithfully restored to its original design.  The long Japanese occupation of Korea from 1911 to 1945 saw it heavily damaged yet again: once again it’s been restored, though only about 30% of the original buildings remain.

Against the odds,  this palace and its grounds together form a UNESCO World Heritage Site, recognised as a fine example of Far Eastern palace architecture and garden design in harmony with their natural setting. This is a fine and tranquil place.

This week’s WordPress Photo Challenge is ‘Against the odds’.

18 thoughts on “Snapshot Saturday: A Korean cultural heritage – against the odds”

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